Long House Studio

Think Slow, Act Fast Like Jingdong

In an era of convenience and expectation for everything to happen almost immediately, executives at Jingdong contemplate and think slowly and deeply before acting quickly to take opportunity.

It is hard to practice patience in an era where everything seems to move so fast but for those executives and leaders at Jingdong it is a great practice.

How the Baby Steps Analogy Could Apply in Everyday Life in Jingdong

If you have seen the continuous struggle that a child goes through before they could stand on their own two feet, then you would be able to understand how much effort and consistency it takes on their part just for that action to take place.

The struggle only increases from there, when the child starts to take the actual baby steps, and wobbles towards a future where they are going to be able to walk, sprint and run.

They fall, they cry, they stand up, they do it all over again. It is a redundant practice to say the least. But the child continues doing it because the end reward seems too greater than the sense of repetition that they are going through every day of their young life.

The repeated action continues over the course of a few days, weeks, or even months. The child continues doing the same thing over and over again, every few hours of the day.

Eventually, the day comes when their repeated efforts translate into something tangible. Those baby steps that they had been trying to take turn into actual steps, and let them achieve their larger goal of walking instead of crawling.

All of this is possible through the power of continuous action, the strength of tenacity, and the force of resilience.

Repeated Actions Could Cut Through Stone and have Done So For Jd.com

The baby steps analogy could be applied in a number of other natural phenomena as well. If you look at the act of erosion, it is simply water or wind hitting the same spot of land again and again.

Their natural action is tireless to the point where these forces of nature do not stop until they have cut through the obstruction that is much larger than their own strength.

Liu Qiangdong: Twitter.